Basement Drain Clogged

Basement Drain Clogged

On the floor of your home’s utility areas such as the laundry room, basement, and garage, lives a hardworking, underappreciated piece of plumbing known as a floor drain. Although it tends to be neglected and often doesn’t get the regular cleaning it needs for optimal performance, your floor drain does an essential job. It swallows up all kinds of sludge and grime like runoff from appliances; dirt, sand, and melted snow from your car; and soap scum, hair, and lint from the washing machine. Occasionally an overload will cause a clog, which can result in water backup and even flooding. This type of plumbing emergency requires immediate attention — the right kind. Avoid commercial drain cleaners, which are caustic and can eat through your pipes, leaving you with a bigger problem than when you started. Use the alternatives below instead.PlungerA plunger is a tool that nearly every householder has on hand (and if you don’t have one, you should!). Smear the edge of the plunger with petroleum jelly to ensure a good seal. Then depress the plunger forcefully several times. Pour in a few cups of water to see whether the water drains.Vinegar and SodaFor this multi-step process, you’ll need: Phillips screwdriver. Rubber gloves. Disposable waterproof container to collect gunk. Old toothbrush. A 1-lb box of baking soda. A 32-oz bottle of vinegar. Boiling water.1. Use a Phillips screwdriver to remove the screw that holds the drain cover in place. (Stash the screw carefully so it won’t get lost.) Put on rubber gloves and lift up the cover. Wipe the underside.2. Reach into the drain to scoop out gunk with your hands. Dispose of it in the container you have at the ready.3. Scrub with the toothbrush to get rid of stuck-on dirt or sediment.4. Pour a quart of boiling water into the drain opening and let it soak for 10 minutes.5. Sprinkle the drain with the entire contents of the box of baking soda, trying to distribute it evenly.6. Follow up with a 32-ounce bottle of white vinegar. Combined with the baking soda, it will fizz up and create a powerful cleaning action.7. Once again, let everthing sit for 10 minutes. Then slowly flush with an additional quart of boiling water.8. Replace the drain cover.Plumber’s Snake (Manual)If this is not successful, try clearing the drain gently with a manual plumber’s snake. Rotate the snake as you insert it. When you feel resistance, you’ll know you’ve reached the source of the blockage. Try to hook the snake onto the clog and keep pushing in order to break it up. Slowly rotate the snake as you withdraw it. Wipe it down with old rags and repeat if necessary. Flush the drain with a stream of water. Once the drain is clear, replace the cover.Professional Plumbers and High Tech ToolsIf none of the above methods is successful, you might consider hiring a professional plumbing service. The average drain cleaning cost is about $150, and it may be well worth it to you to have this headache taken care of. Qualified plumbers have the experience to quickly and accurately diagnose the cause of the blockage. They can then choose the best tools to solve the problem from their stock of high tech equipment — including fiber optic cameras that allow them an interior view of your home’s plumbing, powerful electric augers (“Roto-Rooters”) and hydro-jetters, which attack drain clogs effectively with high-pressure streams of water.But why wait for a plumbing emergency? Savvy homeowners have their drains professionally cleaned every three to five years as a part of their preventive maintenance schedule.Laura Firszt writes for networx.com.
basement drain clogged 1

Basement Drain Clogged

0 Votes Edit Answer (for another 6 minutes) If it is overflowing at the basement floor drain, then the blockage has to be downstream of that point, so that would be a good point to try snaking from. Since it is not happening with regular sink, shower, dishwasher, etc flow you only have a partial blockage that will let 5 gallons or less though OK, but not the 10+ gallons all at once from the dishwasher. I would guess a bathtub emptying causes the same bubbling up.If snaking does not work from the floor drain, then try a point further downstream. Do you have a downstairs toilet, garage floor drain, etc downflow from that floor drain. Frequently semi-floating solids and grease build up at the wye’s to that sort of drain and block the intersection, especially if it is not frequently used, as with a basement guest bathroom (or stubbed out and unused basement toilet or tub connection) or garage floor drain. Try snaking and flushing from those points if the floor drain snaking does not work.When snaking be sure to have water running somewhere upstream of where you are snaking, so what you scrape off goes down the pipe immediately – else you can turn a partial clob into a full blockage. It helps to have someone else watching any basement drains when doing this, so they can run and shut off the water if it starts backing up on you. Also, if you have a crawl space, there may be cleanout plugs there you can snake / flush from.Typically, there will be a vertical cleanout pipe very close outside the house as well (typically about 3″ or 4″ cast iron or black ABS plastic; may have a square-head xxxx -in plug or more likely a rubber cap held on with a stainless steel scre clamp). Remove the cover, and take a strong flashlight and shine it down there at a time the drain is backing up to see if it is backing up in that riser – if so, then your blockage is between the house and the street, not in or under the house (unless there are two). If the blockage is in or under the house, you will see a flow dropping into the riser where the sewer comes out from the house, and flowing freely down the riser into the lower (about 6 feet deep, typically) sewer run to the street. At least initially when you start running water full force, that flow will be less than is going into the pipe because it is backing up in the pipes under the house.Having been down this road myself a couple of times, I have to say that snaking itself yourself may temporarily alleviate the problem, but only the full-diameter cutting edge of the power router used by a sewer and drain contractor really returns the pipe to full diameter, while also removing the grease and toilet tissue buildup in the pipe, which generally needs to be routed out every 5-10 years anyway. Answered 4 years ago by LCD Report It
basement drain clogged 2

Basement Drain Clogged

Edit Answer (for another 6 minutes) If it is overflowing at the basement floor drain, then the blockage has to be downstream of that point, so that would be a good point to try snaking from. Since it is not happening with regular sink, shower, dishwasher, etc flow you only have a partial blockage that will let 5 gallons or less though OK, but not the 10+ gallons all at once from the dishwasher. I would guess a bathtub emptying causes the same bubbling up.If snaking does not work from the floor drain, then try a point further downstream. Do you have a downstairs toilet, garage floor drain, etc downflow from that floor drain. Frequently semi-floating solids and grease build up at the wye’s to that sort of drain and block the intersection, especially if it is not frequently used, as with a basement guest bathroom (or stubbed out and unused basement toilet or tub connection) or garage floor drain. Try snaking and flushing from those points if the floor drain snaking does not work.When snaking be sure to have water running somewhere upstream of where you are snaking, so what you scrape off goes down the pipe immediately – else you can turn a partial clob into a full blockage. It helps to have someone else watching any basement drains when doing this, so they can run and shut off the water if it starts backing up on you. Also, if you have a crawl space, there may be cleanout plugs there you can snake / flush from.Typically, there will be a vertical cleanout pipe very close outside the house as well (typically about 3″ or 4″ cast iron or black ABS plastic; may have a square-head xxxx -in plug or more likely a rubber cap held on with a stainless steel scre clamp). Remove the cover, and take a strong flashlight and shine it down there at a time the drain is backing up to see if it is backing up in that riser – if so, then your blockage is between the house and the street, not in or under the house (unless there are two). If the blockage is in or under the house, you will see a flow dropping into the riser where the sewer comes out from the house, and flowing freely down the riser into the lower (about 6 feet deep, typically) sewer run to the street. At least initially when you start running water full force, that flow will be less than is going into the pipe because it is backing up in the pipes under the house.Having been down this road myself a couple of times, I have to say that snaking itself yourself may temporarily alleviate the problem, but only the full-diameter cutting edge of the power router used by a sewer and drain contractor really returns the pipe to full diameter, while also removing the grease and toilet tissue buildup in the pipe, which generally needs to be routed out every 5-10 years anyway. Answered 4 years ago by LCD Report It

Basement Drain Clogged

Basement Drain Clogged
Basement Drain Clogged
Basement Drain Clogged
Basement Drain Clogged